How Much Does Google Adsense Pay Per Pageview? (And Three Good Alternatives)

How Much Does Google Adsense Pay Per Pageview? (And Three Good Alternatives)

Google Adsense is the way many new bloggers choose to monetize their blogs, but working out how much you can earn from it can be unclear. The big question is, how much does Google Adsense pay per pageview? Well, today we’re going to attempt to answer that question.

Since every site is different, we can’t say exactly how much your blog will earn from Adsense, however, we can offer a ballpark figure to help give you an idea of the earning potential of your blog. We’re also going to be sharing some great alternatives to Adsense, that can help you earn even more money from your blog.

What is Google Adsense, and how does it work?

Google Adsense is an ad network run by Google, which helps publishers monetize their websites and blogs with display ads. Anyone can sign up for Adsense as there are no minimum traffic requirements. This makes it one of the go-to ad networks for brand new bloggers. 

Signing up for an Adsense account is a fairly easy process, but your website will need to be reviewed before being accepted to make sure it is compliant with all of Adsense’s program policies. 

Once your site has been approved, you can start setting up your ads and making money.

Here’s how it works:

  • Simply paste a line of code into your site and choose the pages on which you are happy for ads to be shown. You can exclude any pages where you don’t want ads to be shown, such as your services page, or your online store/e-commerce pages. 
  • Adsense matches different advertisers with your site, depending on the type of content you cover. This means that your audience should only be shown ads that are relevant to them. 
  • Advertisers can bid in real-time for the ad spaces on your site. The highest bid wins, and this is the AdSense ad that will be shown on your site.
  • Adsense collects the payment from the advertisers, and after taking their share of commission, they will pay out your ad earnings. As a publisher, you will receive 68% of the earnings from each ad.

Adsense is completely free for publishers to use and is a great way to start earning money from a brand new blog.

How Much Does Google Adsense Pay Per Pageview?

The amount Google Adsense pays per pageview varies from one site to another. There are lots of things that can affect how much you earn, including where you live, the type of content you produce, and which niche you are in. 

Google Adsense has created a handy earnings calculator to help you estimate how much your website or blog could earn from Adsense each year.

As an example, a home decor site with 50,000 pageviews per month based in the US could make around $14,010 per year in revenue from Google Adsense.

How much does Google AdSense pay per Pageview

You can play around with the calculator to see what blogs in different niches could earn. We tested a few different niches to see how much earnings can vary from niche to niche.

Based on 50,000 pageviews per month, and based in North America:

  • Food and Drink Niche – $8,598 per year ($14.33 per 1000 pageviews on average)
  • Health Niche – $10,440 per year ($17.40 per 1000 pageviews on average)
  • Travel Niche – $8,460 per year ($14.10 per 1000 pageviews on average)
  • Finance – $19,278 per year ($32.13 per 1000 pageviews on average)
  • Beauty and Fitness – $7,806 per year ($13.01 per 1000 pageviews on average)

It’s important to remember that these are only estimates. And to be frank, these estimates are very optimistic. Take them with a pinch of salt. 

At the low end of the scale, you could be earning $2-$5 per 1,000 pageviews. On the other hand, at the higher end of the scale with a blog in a competitive niche and a high CPC you could be looking at $30+ per 1,000 pageviews. 

If you really want to know how much your blog could be making from Google Adsense earnings, you’re better off looking at income reports from other bloggers in your niche to see how much they are making.

Remember, earnings can vary drastically from site to site, country to country, and also fluctuate from season to season.

The Pros and Cons of Google Adsense

Google Adsense isn’t perfect, and as with anything it has its pros and cons. Let’s take a look.

Google Adsense Pros:

  • No minimum traffic requirements
  • Can be used alongside other monetization methods such as affiliate marketing
  • It enables you to start making money from your website straight away
  • Free to join
  • Easy to use – Google handles everything

Google Adsense Cons:

  • $100 minimum payout threshold
  • Low EPMV (earnings per 1,000 visitors) compared to other ad networks

As you can see there are upsides and downsides to using Google Adsense to monetize your blog. It’s not perfect, but for many new bloggers, it’s a great place to start.

Google Adsense Alternatives

Although Google Adsense is a great place to start for new bloggers, there are some great alternatives that can boost your ad revenue and make you more money with no additional work. So if you’ve been looking for a better AdSense alternative, you should consider these options.

Ezoic

Ezoic is a great alternative to Google AdSense

Ezoic is one of the best display ad networks around. In fact, it’s what Spencer uses on his niche sites, including Own The Yard (Niche Site Project 4).

As an official Google partner, Ezoic requires you to be approved by Google Adsense to apply to the program. Ezoic uses AI to optimize the ad performance on your website or blog, meaning you can make more money from each visitor to your blog. Nice, right?!

It basically continually split tests the ads on your site, and the AI learns from this and uses the data to choose the ads that get the best response from your audience. Over time this results in a higher EPMV as your ad optimization increases. 

When Niche Site Project 4 switched over to Ezoic, the ad revenue increased by an impressive 232%! 

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Ezoic used to have a minimum traffic requirement of 10,000 monthly pageviews to join the network, but they’ve recently dropped that, and anyone can sign up now (subject to approval). Best of all, Ezoic has a low payment threshold of just $20, making it perfect for bloggers just getting started who want to collect revenue ASAP.

How much does Ezoic pay per page view?

As with Google Adsense, Ezoic earnings will vary depending on your location, niche, and time of year. According to Ezoic’s 2020 performance report which measured the progress of 300 websites over one year, the average increase in monthly revenue was a massive 93%. 

From the most recent income report, Niche Site Project 4 achieved an EPMV of $19.75. That’s $19.75 for every 1,000 pageviews, which worked out at a total of $2911.78 just from Ezoic ads for one month. That’s a massive amount of extra cash coming in, totaling just over 50% of Own The Yard’s earnings for that month. 

If you’re currently using Adsense to monetize your site, it’s definitely worth switching over to Ezoic. You can join for free, and there is currently no minimum traffic requirement. 

Get Started with Ezoic Here

Mediavine

Mediavine - An Alternative to Google AdSense

Mediavine is a full-service ad management platform for content creators. It is popular with bloggers in the travel, food, home, personal finance, and lifestyle niches, and is known for offering a high RPM (revenue per 1k views).

To join Mediavine you must have an established blog with over 50,000 sessions per month, and regularly produce original, long-form content. Your website or blog will also need to be in good standing with Google Adsense, because much like Ezoic, Mediavine works with Google AdExchange.

If you’re an established blogger regularly reaching over 50,000 sessions per month, then it’s worth considering signing up to Mediavine. You will almost certainly see a boost in your ad revenue.

Check out our in-depth review of Mediavine to see how it increased a niche site’s earnings by 80% after switching over from Adsense.

Read the full Mediavine Review

How much does Mediavine pay per pageview?

The amount Mediavine pays per pageview will vary from site to site, depending on the niche, season, and location of your blog.

RPM (revenue per 1k sessions) can vary from around $10 to $50+, and sometimes even more depending on the niche. 

Adthrive

Adthrive, an alternative to Google AdSense

Adthrive is another premium advertising network that allows content creators to monetize their sites with display ads. It is one of the most popular ad networks around with bigger bloggers and is known for its high RPMs.

Adthrive has strict requirements, so not everyone will be accepted when they apply to join this premium ad network.

To join Adthrive you must have:

  • 100,000 monthly pageviews
  • A majority of your traffic coming from the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand
  • No Google policy infringements and the site must be in good standing with Google Adsense
  • Unique content

As you can see, the requirements for joining Adthrive are a lot higher than Adsense, Ezoic, and even Mediavine. But if you do have over 100k monthly pageviews, you should definitely consider Adthrive.

How much does Adthrive pay per pageview?

It’s tricky to say how exactly, but Adthrive guarantees that your site will earn more with Adthrive than any other ad network.

Publishers using Adthrive see an average increase in revenue of up to 67% compared to their previous ad network.

Which is the best ad network for new bloggers

When it comes to monetizing a new website or blog, display ads are a great place to start.

The great thing about using display ads on your blog is that you can use them alongside other monetization methods such as affiliate marketing, or dropshipping. If you don’t have display ads on your blog already, then by adding them you will see an instant boost in income, so it’s definitely worth it!

If you’re just getting started, then Ezoic is without a doubt the best option for you. Since they no longer have a minimum requirement of 10,000 pageviews, anyone can join, as long as you have a unique blog with high-quality content.

Ezoic also offers excellent customer service and has loads of great features that can actually help speed up your site. Ezoic users have access to a free SSL (HTTPS) and a lightning-fast CDN (Content Delivery Network) with advanced caching to speed up your site and reduce bounce rate.

If you’ve been thinking about using display ads on your website, Ezoic is the best option for new bloggers. It’s free to sign up, so there’s nothing to lose!

Find Out More About Ezoic Here

How Much Does Google Adsense Pay Per 1000 Views?

There are pros and cons to having display ads on your site, but for many people display ads are an easy way to bump up a website’s monthly revenue with no additional work. In fact, display ads can often be a passive income stream on evergreen content, earning you money for years after initially publishing a blog post.

If you have been thinking of using Adsense to monetize your site, you should definitely check out the alternatives we mentioned in this article. By switching to one of these better alternatives you will ensure that you are getting the most from your display ads, and earning as much as possible.

Mediavine and Adthrive are both great options, but they both have high traffic requirements. If you’re not quite there yet traffic-wise, then you should sign up with Ezoic. Ezoic no longer has a minimum traffic requirement and can give you a massive boost in earnings compared to Google Adsense.

A Quick Guide to the Best Zoom Alternatives

A Quick Guide to the Best Zoom Alternatives

Hi, I’m Tony! I’m the Community Program Manager at Team SPI. Since 2015, I’ve been hosting online video gatherings ranging from weekly mastermind groups to multi-hundred-person conferences over Zoom and other platforms. I’m always looking for the best possible tools to help people connect in meaningful ways.

When the pandemic hit, it seems that just about everything in life suddenly ended up on Zoom—and about five minutes later, we were already burned out on all of it. 

I’ve had the benefit of using Zoom for my work for several years before all this happened, so I was pretty comfortable with its strengths and weaknesses. 

There’s a good reason it became the pandemic go-to—it combines a powerful set of features with solid reliability and a (usually) clean user experience. 

But you’re not reading this because you’re totally satisfied with your Zoom experience. There has to be something better out there, right? 

The answer to that, of course, depends on you and what you’re looking to do. 

Here’s what to expect in this post!

And the Zoom alternatives, organized by category:

  1. I need something web-based.
  2. I just need to talk to my team and clients.
  3. I need something that supports my corporate needs.
  4. I need to produce events.
  5. I want to create a virtual space for my people to hang out in.
  6. I don’t actually need video.

Why You Might Want to Use Zoom (or Not)

While I’m a big fan of Zoom, I’ve also been searching hard for the best alternatives depending on the different needs of the various meetings and events I host online. 

Benefits of Zoom

Some of Zoom’s key strengths:

  • It’s established. So many people have learned how to use Zoom already, so you can build on that convenience. 
  • It’s (pretty) affordable. For ~$15 per month, you get an incredibly powerful platform with a lot of tools. 
  • It works well. Part of what fed Zoom’s success was its ability to do exactly what it sets out to do, as well as or better than just about everyone else. They thought through the user experience and removed barriers left and right, making quality video meetings dead easy to host. They’re tops for a reason! 
  • It’s got powerful features. When you get comfortable with Zoom’s capabilities, you can do some pretty sophisticated things. Breakout rooms, advanced screen sharing capabilities, polls, live streaming, and more allow you to go as far as hosting whole conferences.

Disadvantages of Zoom

Some reasons why you might not want to use Zoom:

  • Cost. The free level only lets you host meetings for 40 minutes at a time. 
  • Software requirements. Hosts requires software to be installed. 
  • No perpetual room. Each meeting has a start and end time. 
  • No P2P network. People join or leave meetings, but there’s no way to connect outside that. 
  • Wonky breakout rooms. While Zoom has powerful breakout room features, it’s easy for things to go haywire if you’re not careful.
  • Lack of event production features. Zoom is functional, but it doesn’t give you tools to produce a slick, professional looking event. 

With this in mind, I wanted to offer you an overview of some of the best platforms I’ve found, based on how your needs contrast with what Zoom has to offer. 

Note: This landscape is changing constantly. New platforms are coming out every single day, and existing ones are launching new features continuously. Consider this a snapshot of my subjective opinion!

1. I need something web-based.

No installation needed—just pop open a browser window and go!

Google Meet

Google’s approach to video meetings used to drive me crazy. For years, they struggled to nail down a consistent strategy, changing brands and rearranging their interfaces to the point where it was just all too confusing. 

Not long after the pandemic hit, however, they finally found a sweet spot—offering just enough functionality and a clean, sensible interface that put the tools I needed in just the right spots.

Forcing integration into Google Calendar, annoying as it may be to a non-Meet user, does make it that much more convenient to book a meeting with a handy link without having to leave the calendar app. 

My biggest caveat with Google Meet has been in its CPU usage. While in recent weeks I haven’t noticed as much of an issue, I have had months-long stretches when using Google Meet meant spiking my not-that-old computer’s CPU and slowing everything else to a crawl. 

If you decide to try it, keep an eye on how it operates on your machine!

Join.me

One of the early entrants into browser-based meeting, join.me differentiated themselves by their emphasis on being lightweight and easy. If you’re looking for something simple, especially for one-off meetings, join.me is here for you!

2. I just need to talk to my team and clients.

If you largely have a consistent team of trusted people you want to communicate with (and enable communications between), team-oriented platforms have been aggressively upgrading their video capabilities. 

Slack

If you’re already in a shared Slack channel with the people you talk to over video, you could cut Zoom out of the loop altogether and do your calls straight through Slack. The interface is relatively lightweight compared to Zoom’s features, but the convenience can’t be beat. 

Discord

Originally a hit with the gaming community, Discord pushed the envelope with chat-oriented team channel spaces to the point where businesses have started to take notice. While chat is the default mode of engagement, adding voice and video are easy, with customizations galore. 

Skype

Remember Skype? They’ve been in the game longer than anyone. While they’ve dealt with more than a fair share of Microsoft-imposed bloat, Skype haas remained a consistent, hardened option for people who need to communicate—especially when you might be mixing international calling with your team chats. 

3. I need something that supports my corporate needs.

Are you looking for something that supports the wider needs of a larger organization? Zoom’s been building out its enterprise offerings, but others live and breathe it. 

Microsoft Teams

Opinions may vary widely about the experience of Teams, but it’s clear Microsoft has invested heavily in becoming one of the heaviest hitters in enterprise communications. Teams offers many of the features other platforms have, but plays particularly nicely with Microsoft-oriented businesses. 

Webex, GoToMeeting, BlueJeans, Adobe Connect

There are a wide array of corporate-oriented platforms. If you’re looking to make a decision that affects the wider business needs of your organization, I won’t try to tell you which way to go—research the platforms that are out there, define your feature needs, do the demos, and the best answer will emerge.

4. I need to produce events. 

Zoom is a powerful event production platform, but the onus is completely on the organizer to get the content right. Luckily, others are working on making the organizer’s job easier.  

Gatheround (formerly Icebreaker)

I’m as excited about Gatheround as I am about any meeting software platform I’ve seen. They clearly designed the experience specifically to make it easy for people to connect and cultivate meaningful relationships—you can create time-based breakout rooms where people are presented with card-based discussion prompts in either small groups or 1:1 rooms. 

A lobby area offers a great transitional space between breakouts, where a combination of chat and stage area (that others can join with permission) encourages social interaction that just feels different.

HeySummit

If you need a more complete conference-level experience, where each talk can have its own landing page, HeySummit has you covered. You still need another provider to handle the video (Zoom, YouTube, Vimeo, etc.), but HeySummit wraps it in a nice user-friendly shell.

(Disclosure: The folks at HeySummit are good friends of ours.)

5. I want to create a virtual space for my people to hang out in.

The world of “proximity chat” has come a long way—from niche community of super-online escapists to mainstream tool for virtual conferences and more. These video game-like environments allow you to create a sense of place, where people can explore and bump into each other. 

On these platforms, when people’s avatars come into close proximity to one another, their videos come into focus, so you can talk to only those who are “near” you at any given moment. It’s kind of like real life! 

Topia

Topia’s hand-drawn style is incredibly appealing to me, personally, because it stands in such contrast to everything else I’m used to seeing. It feels a little more nature-oriented. It helps me feel like I’m entering a special little world. 

Its administrative interface is not for the faint of heart—you need to be willing to poke around and take your time to get to know how things work, and work around some of its features’ more maddening constraints—but your patience will be rewarded with an experience unlike anything most people have seen. 

You can create a custom environment or use one of their templates, which I highly recommend—starting from scratch can be incredibly time consuming, while their templates offer a great insight into the features they offer. 

Gather.town

My other favorite proximity chat app is gather.town. It’s a bit further along in terms of its development, but still have a lot of quirks when it comes to setup and administration. This world isn’t for the established corporate player just yet, but I expect some of these platforms will get there some time soon!

Gather.town has a simplified, Legend of Zelda-like overhead view with a little digital avatar for each person. You can draw rooms, set up walls and floors and decor, and install interactive points where people can view videos, web pages, presentations, or even play a game together. 

Workfrom

In Workfrom, you can create a perpetual “room” where people can come to hang out and work alongside one another. It’s explicitly not a space to hold a scheduled meeting: while cameras will be on, microphones are disabled. You can only talk to each other over chat, leaving your ears free to focus on the admin-chosen musical playlist while you do other things. 

Custom wallpaper and simple discussion prompts in the chat round out an incredibly simple but truly powerful tool for creating a sense of shared presence among a team or small community. 

Go wild

Try everything! There are dozens of these platforms. Check out a giant list here

6. I don’t actually need video.

Video is a powerful tool when you’re gathering people remotely—it’s about as close as we can get to being together, even if it’s not nearly the same. 

How many video meetings, however, actually need to be on video? There are a lot of reasons why someone might not want to be on video at a given time: physical comfort, being on the go, insecurity about their appearance or their environment, internet issues, slow computers, and more. If you can gather people without asking them to turn on their cameras, you can get greater turnout and offer a more accessible experience. 

What tools do you already have, or which could you use for non-video related needs?

Chat apps

We already covered the usual suspects above—chat apps and other asynchronous social spaces are powerful tools when used right. 

Free Conference Call

Along with Mumble, Free Conference Call does exactly what it says it does—with just a few hoops to jump through, you can have a dial-in number set up in no time.

Zoom!

That’s right—Zoom itself is actually a pretty powerful platform for facilitating audio-only phone conversations. If you’ve ever seen one of those big complicated boilerplate Zoom invitations, you’ve seen that Zoom offers call-in numbers for people to easily dial from their phones, without having to memorize and punch in meeting IDs and passcodes. 

Once in the meeting, phone participants actually have a few useful controls available to them just through use of the number pad—even allowing participants to move in and out of breakout rooms. 

Just pick up the phone!

Regular old phone calls—remember them? They might just be the refreshing alternative to being stuck behind your desk looking into a camera. 

To Zoom or Not to Zoom

In the end, Zoom is often the best answer, if not because of its quality execution and affordable price then simply because it’s the one people tend to be the most familiar with. 

If you’re looking for something better, however, a whole lot of people are out there working hard to create products that offer you something different. Try different approaches using different platforms and invite friends or colleagues to experiment with you!

5 Alternatives to Yahoo Groups

5 Alternatives to Yahoo Groups

Yahoo Groups was one of the original online communities. You could use it to create or participate in online chats with people from across the world who have the same interests and ideas as you.

A host of new online communication tools have been released in recent years. Many of these new platforms offer features Yahoo Groups doesn’t. After lagging behind their competitors for a few years, Yahoo Groups officially shut down in December of 2020.

Thankfully, if you were a fan, there are a plethora of alternatives to Yahoo Groups. Below, we’ll discuss our favorites so you can pick the best online group platforms for you.

What Was Yahoo Groups Used For?

Yahoo launched Groups in January 2001. Users could post messages, polls, photos, events, files, mailing lists, links to websites, and more. The platform soon became a popular host for vibrant online discussion boards.

If you owned a group, you could also assign moderators to help you run and oversee all the group’s activities.

Online businesses and marketers took advantage of the platform. This is a place where you could easily post a recent blog, image, or file to drive brand awareness and increase website traffic.

I know what you’re thinking—this sounds very similar to many of the online tools we have today. That’s because Yahoo Groups was similar. In fact, you could argue that Yahoo Groups was the foundation for many popular social media and online groups.

At the height of its popularity, Yahoo announced it had 115 million users and 10 million groups.

But a quick search for the platform today will show you this:

Where do you go from here?

Here’s a list of the best Yahoo Groups alternatives to create valuable online connections with your market.

What Are the Best Alternatives to Yahoo Groups?

If you used Yahoo Groups and want to continue creating online communities with like-minded people, drive traffic to your website, or build brand awareness, it’s essential to look for an alternative that will meet your needs—and the needs of your audience.

Here are five options to consider.

1. Facebook Groups

Facebook has over 2 billion monthly active users, and over 1 billion users participate in Facebook Groups each month.

Besides catching up with old and new friends, creating a group on this platform makes sense, especially for businesses. It can help you position your brand, find potential customers, and build long-term relationships with them.

Like Yahoo Groups, Facebook Groups allow you to schedule group events, share files, images, and other useful tools to continue engaging and connecting with your market.

While many brands may have Facebook Pages, Facebook Groups are where the magic lies because they see a lot more engagement than Pages.

Facebook Groups allow members to start and participate in conversations easily. They can also be private—when you have a closed group, members can engage and share their thoughts in a private setting that can only be seen by group members.

There are three types of Groups to choose from. Depending on your needs, you can create:

  • A Public Group: Anyone can access the group and see what users post.
  • A Closed Group: This is a private group. You can search and find the group, but members still need approval before gaining access to the group.
  • A Secret Group: These are invite-only groups where only invited users can find the group or see what other users post.

Here’s how to create a Facebook Group:

After logging into your account, click the + button from the top right and select Group.

Next, enter your group name, choose privacy options, and invite people to join the group.

Once you’ve filled in the details, select Create.

You can further personalize the group by adding a description and cover photo.

If you want to start a successful Facebook Group for your brand, the first step is to decide on your Group’s purpose.

  • Are you a new brand and trying to increase brand awareness?
  • Are you trying to reach new customers?
  • Do you want to provide a group for your existing customers where you can nurture long-term relationships?
  • Would you like to showcase your expertise and establish authority in a niche market?

Understanding the purpose of your group will help direct all the content you create.

For instance, let’s say you sell a weight loss coaching program that lasts for six months. You can create a private Group for customers who are currently in coaching to share unique content and allow members to support each other.

Creating this type of group allows members to learn more about your brand and get the support they need while using your service.

2. Meetup

The concept behind Meetup is simple—choose what you’re interested in or passionate about, find a local group that shares that same interest, attend events the group organizes, and connect with like-minded people.

The groups you join or create on this platform can be about anything: book clubs, bike rides, business networking, music, or other niche social activities.

Of course, the main difference between Meetup and Yahoo Groups is that Meetup focuses on creating real-life encounters with the people you meet online.

If your business or brand caters to local communities, then Meetup could be a great fit.

Let’s say you own a coffee shop in New York. You can find and join groups of other coffee lovers in the area. Once you’ve joined the groups, you can engage with members, build relationships, and invite them to a company event.

If you can’t find a relevant group, you can create one.

Once you’ve signed up, you’ll go through a seven-step process. This includes:

Selecting your group’s location:

Choosing topics that best relate to your group:

Choosing a group name:

Describing what your group will be about:

It is free for users to sign up for the service. However, meeting organizers pay a monthly fee.

There are currently two pricing options:

  • $4.99 per month for six months. This plan is for smaller groups.
  • $15.00 per group per month for six months. This plan includes unlimited groups and allows you access to attendee emails.

Whichever plan you choose, creating a Meetup group will help you connect with relevant people in real-life.

3. Nextdoor

Like Meetup, Nextdoor is a platform where local communities connect in real life, outside of online communications.

For Nextdoor, you must be a part of a particular neighborhood, as the focus is more on building a good network with your neighbors.

On the site, they explain:

“It’s where communities come together to greet newcomers, exchange recommendations, and read the latest local news. Where neighbors support local businesses and get updates from public agencies, borrow tools, and sell couches. It’s how to get the most out of everything nearby. Welcome, neighbor.”

Nextdoor shares a few similar features to Yahoo Groups, such as file sharing, chat messaging, and wiki pages.

For a local business or brand, creating a Nextdoor account makes sense as the platform has grown exponentially. It doesn’t just focus on residential neighbors anymore. Local businesses, public agencies, nonprofits, and brands are also recognized on the platform.

You can then decide whether you want to create an open or a private group.

For an open group:

  • Anyone in the neighborhood can search, find, and join the group.
  • Potential group members outside the community can still request to join if you send them a link.

For a private group:

  • Anyone in the neighborhood can find and request to join the group.
  • Group admins approve requests.
  • Only members of the group can view messages and discussions.

The platform is completely free to use, but you can also advertise your business or brand using Local Deals to gain traction. This is where you can share discounts and promotions with your neighborhood.

The price for Local Deals depends on your neighborhood and how long you want to advertise, but the average cost is $75.

4. Groups.io

Mark Fletcher created groups.io. You might have heard of him before. He founded ONElist, which eventually became known as Yahoo Groups.

When he introduced Groups.io, Fletcher explained that:

Yahoo Groups and Google Groups both exude the dank air of benign neglect. Google Groups hasn’t been updated in years, and some of Yahoo’s recent changes have actually made Yahoo Groups worse! And yet, millions of people put up with this uncertainty and neglect, because email groups are still one of the best ways to communicate with groups of people. And I have a plan to make them even better.

Groups.io is an email-based service with features that include:

  • Integration with other popular products, such as Slack, GitHub, Facebook Pages, and Dropbox
  • Hashtags to help keep group messages organized
  • Unlimited chat rooms

Groups.io is a Freemium product, which means the basic features are free to use, but you can pay extra to customize your homepage, access extra storage space, schedule events, and send reminders.

The best part about Groups.io is that there is no advertising! If you spend a lot of time online, you’ll appreciate this.

5. Discourse

Another popular online discussion forum is Discourse. Users can use it as a discussion forum, mailing list, or chat room.

Creating an online group on a different and unfamiliar site can be an overwhelming process. There’s a free 14-day trial, which you can use to help familiarize yourself with the platform and see if it can be a good fit for you and your needs.

Like Yahoo Groups and the other options on our list, Discourse is an online discussion forum that allows you to create discussions, share links, files, and integrate with various devices and online tools.

If you’ve been on online discussion forums for a while, you’ll know that some users don’t follow the rules. The platforms we’ve covered so far allow group moderators to filter out inappropriate content and users.

On Discourse, the focus is more on community moderation. However, they do offer various moderation tools, including the ability to move posts to an existing topic, merge with other posts, or delete.

Members who’ve displayed consistently positive behaviors earn likes and badges. Furthermore, they can help to maintain and moderate content and resolve disputes.

There are three pricing plan options:

  • Standard: $100 per month
  • Business: $300 per month
  • Enterprise: You’ll need to contact them for a custom quote

Conclusion

A lot has changed in the world of online communication. Yahoo Groups was once a popular pioneer of online communities, but it’s closed down, like many other trailblazers. Thankfully, there are plenty of advanced Yahoo alternatives to choose from.

Whatever you decide on, I hope you found the above information helpful.

Can you think of other alternative online groups that are great for building connections?