How to Create a Killer 5-Minute Presentation

How to Create a Killer 5-Minute Presentation

Developing and delivering a five-minute presentation seems an easy enough task at first — until you realize the condensed format actually requires significantly more efficiency, focus, and attention to detail than longer presentation types.

When there’s less time to get your point across, every second counts more.

While short presentations can be unexpectedly challenging to create, when done correctly they can be more impactful than longer presentations.

Five minutes is just enough time for you to present a compelling narrative about one topic, without any filler or fluff. The time limit forces you to pack as much valuable information as possible into your presentation while maintaining a coherent structure.

The shorter format also encourages audiences to pay more attention.

But how can you ensure your short presentation accomplishes everything it needs to within just five short minutes? We’ve put together an (appropriately condensed) guide on five-minute presentations to help you get started.

→ Free Download: 4 PowerPoint Presentation Templates [Access Now]

How Many Words Are in a 5-Minute Presentation?

A person speaks on average 120 to 160 words a minute, which means the average five-minute presentation will be anywhere from 600 to 800 words. That means every word should be carefully chosen to support the central idea of your presentation.

When constructing a longer presentation, you might be more concerned about transitions and keeping the audience engaged with more extensive narrative elements.

In a short presentation, everything you say should directly tie back to your central premise and further advance your main point. By keeping a tight scope and using your words carefully, you’ll ensure your time isn’t wasted and the audience leaves with a clear, singular takeaway.

How many slides are in a 5-minute presentation?

Generally speaking, you’ll want to stick to just five or six slides for a five-minute presentation, but there’s no set limit on how many yours will require. You may choose to have twenty slides and to spend about 10 or 15 seconds on each depending on your subject matter.

More important than your slide count is what each slide contains. While it’s a good rule to keep your slides simple and focused on visuals (instead of text) for a presentation of any length, this becomes especially important when you’re dealing with a condensed presentation window.

It can be tempting with a small time window to try to cram in as much information as possible — resist the urge. Instead, focus on simple, clean visuals that (once again) all tie back to your central premise.

If you’re concerned that scaling back the scope of your presentation will leave things out, add a slide at the end of the deck with additional resources and information that your audience can access after the presentation is over.

5-Minute Presentation Example Format

If you’re looking for a starting point for your own five-minute presentation, we’ve created a basic outline below you can use to organize your initial thoughts in the planning stage.

You can choose to devote one slide to each section or multiple slides if you want to break them down further.

Feel free to make departures from the structure depending on the content or format of your presentation. Just remember not to give your audience too much to chew on — the key here is — you guessed it — tying every slide back to one central idea.

An Extremely Short Introduction

Your first slide should serve as an introduction to the topic of your presentation. Try to limit your title to around six words or even less. If your title is too long, it can become unwieldy and your presentation may confuse your audience by covering too much.

Remember: your audience (hopefully!) already has an idea of what you’re presenting on, so you don’t need to spend too much precious time or slide real-estate explaining what you’re going to cover — just jump right in.

A Problem Slide

Most presentations can be boiled down to a problem you’ve identified, solved, or are in the process of solving. Lead with that familiar narrative. It will give your presentation a clear starting point and prime your audience for the rest of your slides.

A Solution/Analysis Slide(s)

Now that your problem has been introduced, tell your audience what they need to know about what you’re doing about it. In shorter presentation formats, you’ll want to focus less on the details and more on the big-picture items. Ask yourself: what does your audience need to know when they leave the room? Anything that falls into the “nice to know” category can be cut and delivered to stakeholders after the meeting in a follow-up email.

A Conclusion Slide

The conclusion side allows you to bring a coherent end to your presentation and summarize the important takeaway points for your audience. Don’t skimp on your conclusion just because it’s a short presentation — it’s the last thing your audience will hear from you. A good conclusion will reinforce the other information you presented and ultimately makes your presentation as a whole more memorable.

5-Minute Presentation Examples

While we (unfortunately) weren’t in the room when these presentations were originally given — and therefore can’t confirm with 100% certainty that they ran for only five minutes — these decks all clock in at under 15 slides and use a simple format to convey a problem and solution.

1. AirBnB Pitch Deck

2. Buffer Pitch Deck

3. Mixpanel Pitch Deck

How Do I Create a Killer 5-Minute Presentation?

Here are some best practices to follow when crafting a short presentation.

1. Focus on the most important part.

The greatest challenge you’ll have when designing your presentation is choosing what to focus on — but from the format we discussed above, you can see how important it is to have a single premise to design your presentation around.

It’s easy to become overambitious in your presentation or to be overwhelmed by the information you want to present. Choosing a single idea to focus on gives you clarity when designing your speech and allows you to cut extraneous information. It also provides a narrative structure that your audience can more easily grasp.

2. Research, fact-check, and do it twice.

Your presentation is your chance to shine — but the shorter format also means that each point you make is going to be more visible, memorable, and consequentially more vulnerable to scrutiny.

Take the time to thoroughly research the subject of your presentation and ensure every point you make is both technically accurate and easy to understand. This will put you in a better position to field questions and discuss your subject in-depth. With a strong command of your subject matter, your delivery will also be more confident and convincing.

3. Appeal to how people learn best: stories.

A story can give meaning to your presentation and elevate it to more than just facts, figures, and some flashy slides. Building your presentation around a simple, easy-to-understand narrative (like the problem/solution narrative we showed you in the template avoid) can make your content more digestible. Your presentation will only last for a few minutes, but the story you tell needs to stick around in your audiences’ brains for longer — and stories naturally help humans understand and retain information more easily.

4. Don’t skip that practice session.

Just because your presentation is only five minutes doesn’t mean you should try to wing it. Your audience’s time is valuable, and practicing your presentation before you deliver it to them will help you make the most of it.

From CEOs to interns, everyone can benefit from practicing their presentations in advance, no matter how confident they are.

If you’re able to deliver much (or all) of it by heart, your delivery will be much more natural, allowing you to develop a stronger connection with your audience. And once nerves hit, you’ll have the muscle memory to fall back on and carry you through the rough patches!

5. Relax and don’t rush.

You only have five minutes to present, so it’s only natural to feel pressure to go a little too fast. Stay relaxed throughout your presentation and avoid distractions, such as someone informing you that you only have a minute left.

Staying focused on your presentation itself will improve your delivery and give you more confidence, even if you’re normally terrified of public speaking.

If you find yourself needing to speed through your presentation to squeeze it into a five-minute window, that’s a good sign you’re trying to do too much and need to consider cutting your slides down.

You Know Your Audience Best

When creating your five-minute presentation, think about your audience and craft it to appeal to them.

The information you decide to highlight and the way you frame it will be vastly different depending on who your presentation is meant for.

It’s natural to be nervous going into your presentation, especially if you don’t like public speaking or have a fear of it, but with enough consideration and practice, you’ll be a master of whatever subject you hope to present.

powerpoint slides

How to Create a Solid Landing Page That Converts

How to Create a Solid Landing Page That Converts

If you want to convince your visitors to take action on your website, you have to create a solid landing page.

A landing page is a special web page designed to promote your products or services to boost your sales and reach your conversion goals. Many marketers often confuse a landing page with a homepage. But the two are completely different.

A homepage is usually the first page of a website that is designed to provide information to its visitors.

A landing page, on the other hand, is not necessarily the first page of your website. The main objective of the landing page is to persuade a visitor to take a specific action.

This can be to make a purchase, subscribe to a newsletter, download a digital file, etc. It can be different for different businesses based on what their conversion goals are.

Landing pages are more about conversions and hence are directly related to the success of your business. That’s why it’s important that you create a solid landing page that can convince people to do what you want them to do.

Here are a few tips that can help you create a powerful landing page that converts.

1. Choose a Powerful Landing Page Builder

The first step to creating a solid landing page is to choose a powerful landing page builder. There are various page builders that’ll help you create beautiful landing pages for your website. But it’s important that you choose a page builder that suits your business needs and aligns with your designing skills.

Plugins like SeedProd can be a great option for all marketers, irrespective of their business goals.

This plugin is super easy to use and is highly flexible in terms of customizing your landing page designs. To make things simpler, it offers an intuitive drag and drop builder and some pre-built landing page templates too. You can either use these templates directly and tweak them a bit for the final result or create your own landing page from scratch.

SeedProd also offers various pre-built smart sections like headers, calls to action, FAQs, and more. You can simply drag the section you want and drop it on the landing page in your page builder. The good thing about this plugin is that you can use it to create a professional-looking landing page even if you have no designing skills at all.

2. Keep it Simple

The next important point to remember is to keep your landing page simple. It’s easy to design good-looking and complex landing pages when you have a good page builder.

But the problem is that when you offer too much information and several options on a single page, you end up confusing and distracting your visitor. As a result, they’ll take more time in making a decision.

If you don’t want that to happen, always keep your landing page as simple as possible. Keep your copy brief and try to keep things relevant and specific. You also need to ensure that your visitors aren’t distracted by any headers or links. The main motive here should be to highlight the core message of the page.

3. Add a Killer Headline

Your headline is the first thing that your visitors will notice on your landing page. This means that your headline will set the first impression on your audience. And based on that, they will either continue to read further or opt-out of your landing page.

The secret of good copy is to get your user to read every sentence one after the other until they reach the call-to-action. And the headline is the first sentence in this process. So make sure you have a powerful and catchy headline that hooks the visitors right away.

You can use tools like the IsItWP Headline Analyzer to find out how powerful your headline is. Just add your headline to the given field and click on the Analyze button. It will quickly analyze it for you and tell you how good it is by rating it on a scale of 100.

The higher this number is, the better your headline will be. It also checks the balance of words, the use of emotions, power words, etc., and tells you if it needs any improvement.

4. Add Social Proof

Another important element that can instantly make your landing page more powerful is strong social proof. These are small messages that show up on your website when a visitor engages with your brand and looks something like this –

These notifications trigger FOMO in your visitors, and they instantly respond to it.

FOMO or Fear of Missing Out is a psychological phenomenon that arises out of the belief that others are enjoying something without them.

So when they see social proof of others buying your product, they try to grab the opportunity in fear of missing out. Using social proof on your website is a very effective way of reaching your conversion goals.

Products like TrustPulse make it easy to add social proof on your website without coding a single line.

5. Use Videos

Videos always make your content more interesting. So using it on your landing pages can be a great way of catching your visitor’s attention.

The best thing about videos is that it lets you explain a complex product in a simple way within a very short span of time. Besides, it helps people understand the product better because they get to see how it appears in reality. So they know what to expect from it, and people are more likely to respond to such content.

You can simply create a video and upload it on YouTube and then embed it on your website. There are various tools that let you do that. But the best option is Smash Balloon. With this tool, embedding videos on your website becomes easy even if you have no prior experience with it.

These are some of the tips that can help you create a powerful landing page for your business. But remember, no landing page is complete without a well-optimized CTA. So make sure you add one that encourages people to click.

Syed Balkhi is an award-winning entrepreneur and online marketing expert. He is the co-founder of OptinMonster, WPBeginner, MonsterInsights, and WPForms.

A Deep Dive Into Facebook Ads: How to Create, Optimize, and Test Facebook Ads

A Deep Dive Into Facebook Ads: How to Create, Optimize, and Test Facebook Ads

As a savvy internet user, you might think no one clicks on Facebook ads.

You’d be wrong.

Facebook is on track to make over $60 billion in revenue this year from advertising.

Someone’s clicking.

How do you get them to click your Facebook ads? More importantly, how do you get them to buy your product or sign up for your email list?

Many marketers who have tried Facebook ads, especially in their early days, decided that Facebook advertising doesn’t work.

Don’t believe them.

If you’re totally new to Facebook, start with this Facebook Marketing Guide. Then come back to this post for a deep dive into advertising.

In this advanced Facebook guide, you’ll learn which businesses are the best fit for Facebook ads and how to run successful campaigns.

We’ll cover the most common mistakes marketers make and the biggest factor in your ad’s success.

You can learn more and create your first ad at Facebook.com/advertising.

How Do Facebook Ads Work?

Facebook ads now come in several varieties. You can promote your Page, posts on your Page, actions users took, or your website itself. Despite Facebook’s increasing focus on native ads and keeping traffic on its site, you can still be successful in sending users to your website.

There are also several ad formats including images, videos, carousel (multiple images), Instant Experiences, and collections.

Facebook ads are targeted to users based on their location, demographic, and profile information.

Many of these options are only available on Facebook. After creating an ad, you set a budget and bid for each click or thousand impressions that your ad will receive.

<imgsrc=”https: neilpatel.com=”” wp-content=”” uploads=”” 2012=”” 08=”” facebook-ad-targeting-options.jpg”=””></imgsrc=”https:>

Users then see your ads in the sidebar on Facebook or in their newsfeed.

This guide will walk you through the best practices for creating CPC ads that drive traffic to your website.

Facebook’s other ad options are great for driving engagement and brand awareness, but ads driving users off-site are still the best option for direct response advertisers looking to make a sale.

Who Should Advertise on Facebook?

Many businesses fail at Facebook advertising because they are not a good fit. You should always test new marketing channels, especially before demand drives up prices, but make sure to consider whether your business model is a good fit for Facebook.

In the past, Facebook ads were more like display ads than search ads — though new versions of ads, like product ads, allow advertisers to sell products directly to users.

Here are a few types of businesses that are likely to succeed with Facebook advertising.

Businesses with Low-Friction Conversions

The businesses that succeed with Facebook ads ask users to sign up, not to buy. You must use a low-friction conversion to be successful.

A visitor to your website wasn’t looking for your product. They clicked your ad on a whim. If you’re relying on them to immediately buy something to make your ad ROI positive, you will fail.

Facebook users are fickle and likely to click back to Facebook if you ask for a big commitment (purchase) upfront. Instead, stick to simple conversions like signing up for your service, filling out a short lead form, or submitting an email address.

Even if you sell products, not services, you should consider focusing on an intermediate conversion like a newsletter signup. Then you can upsell later through email marketing or Facebook retargeting ads.

Daily deal sites like Groupon, AppSumo, and Fab are good examples of businesses that can succeed with Facebook advertising. After you click one of their ads, they just ask for your email address. They’ll sell you on a deal later.

Business Model with Long Sales Cycle or Small Purchases

Even if you only ask for an email address initially, you’ll need to eventually make money from these users if your ads are to be profitable.

The best business model that fits for Facebook ads earn revenue from their users over time, not all at once. A user may have given you their email, but you’ll need to build more trust before they are likely to buy anything.

You shouldn’t depend on one big purchase. Several smaller purchases are ideal.

Daily deal and subscription sites are great examples of business models that can thrive on Facebook. Both have customers whose lifetime value is spread out over six months or more.

At Udemy, they focus on getting users to sign up on their first visit. By aiming to be profitable on ad spend in six months (not one day), they turn Facebook users into long-term customers.

They target a 20% payback on ad spend on day one and 100% payback in six months. These numbers can serve as a rough guide for your business.

How to Target Facebook Ads

The number one mistake most marketers make with Facebook ads is not targeting them correctly.

Facebook’s ad targeting options are unparalleled. You can target by demographics and create custom or lookalike audiences to target users similar to your best customers. You can also use retargeting ads to target users who have interacted with your page, or visited your website.

On Facebook, you can directly target users by:

  • Location
  • Age
  • Gender
  • Interests
  • Connections
  • Relationship Status
  • Languages
  • Education
  • Workplaces

Each option can be useful, depending on your audience. Most marketers should focus on location, age, gender, and interests.

Location allows you to targets users in the country, state, city, or zip code that you service.

Age and gender targeting should be based on your existing customers. If women 25-44 are the bulk of your customers, start out targeting them. If they prove to be profitable, you can then expand your targeting.

Interest targeting is the most powerful but misused feature of Facebook ads. When creating an ad, you have two options: broad categories or detailed interests.

Broad Category Targeting

Broad categories include topics like Gardening, Horror Movies, and Consumer Electronics. Recently, Facebook has added newer targets like Engaged (1 year), Expecting Parents, Away from Hometown, and Has Birthday in 1 Week.

Broad interests may seem like an efficient way to reach a large audience. However, these users often cost more and spend less. You’ll also need to install the Facebook pixel.

This used to be an ineffective way to reach audiences; however the addition of the Facebook pixel and dynamic ads makes this far more effective.

It is worth testing; but detailed interest targeting is often more effective.

Detailed Interest Targeting

Detailed Interest Targeting allows you to target users based on information in their profile including “listed likes and interests, the Pages they like, apps they use, and other profile (timeline) content they’ve provided” (according to Facebook). You’ll find the best ROI using Detailed Interest targeting.

Facebook has an amazing array of interests to target from Harry Potter to underwater rugby. The hard part is choosing the right ones.

When targeting detailed interests, Facebook provides the size of the audience and other suggested likes and interests. You won’t have any competitive data. Once you select interests for an ad, Facebook will show an aggregate suggested bid.

Many marketers target the largest groups possible.

This is a mistake. These groups are more expensive and less targeted.

Rather than target broad terms for your niche like “yoga” or “digital photography,” focus on specific interests. Research which magazines and blogs your customers read, who they follow on Twitter, and which related products they buy.

If you use laser-focused interests like these, you’ll reach the people who are most interested in your topic and the most willing to spend money on it.

For example, if you wanted to sell a new DJ course, don’t just target the interest “disc jockey.”

Instead, create ads targeting DJ publications like DJ Magazine and Mixmag. Then created another ad targeting DJ brands like Traktor and Vestax.

Combine smaller, related interests into a group with an audience of 50,000 to 1M+. This structure will create ads with large audiences that are likely to convert.

<imgsrc=”https: neilpatel.com=”” wp-content=”” uploads=”” 2012=”” 08=”” facebook-interest-group-targeting.jpg”=””></imgsrc=”https:>

Advanced tip: Use Facebook Login as a sign-up option on your site. When users connect via Facebook, you’ll be able to analyze their interests. Index these interests against the number of fans of their respective Facebook Pages. You’ll be left with your high-affinity interests.

Facebook Lookalike Audiences

In addition to targeting users directly, Facebook gives you the ability to Lookalike Audiences.

So what are Facebook Lookalike Audiences? These are Facebook users that are similar to your current users. You’ll need to have Facebook Pixel or other custom audience data, like an email list. Then, you can ask Facebook to find similar users.

They are highly customizable — for example, you could create a “new customer” ad, then exclude current customers from seeing your ads.

This page on Facebook will walk you through how to create Lookalike audiences.

Retargeting with Facebook Ads

Retargeting ads allow you to reach customers who are already familiar with your brand. You can double down by creating dynamic ads that show people items they are likely to be interested in.

For example, you could retarget users who have visited your site, left items in their cart, or clicked on an ad.

To create a retargeting ad, the first step is to install the Facebook Pixel. Follow this guide in Facebook’s Business center to get started.

Images for Facebook Ads

The most important part of your Facebook ad is the image. You can write the most brilliant copy in the world, but if your image doesn’t catch a user’s eye, you won’t get any clicks.

Don’t use low-quality images, generic stock photography, or any images that you don’t have the rights to use. Don’t steal anything from Google Images. Unless you’re a famous brand, don’t use your logo.

Now that we have the no’s out of the way, how should advertisers find images to use? Buy them, create them yourself, or use ones with a Creative Commons license.

Below you’ll learn which types of images work best and where specifically to find them.

People

Images of people work best. Preferably their faces. Use close-ups of attractive faces that resemble your target audience.

Younger isn’t always better. If you’re targeting retirees, test pictures of people over 60. Using a pretty 25 year old girl wouldn’t make sense.

Facebook sidebar ad images are small (254 by 133 pixels). Make sure to focus on a person’s face and crop it if necessary. Don’t use a blurry or dark picture.

Use this ad image guide on Facebook to see the size requirements for other ads, like desk top news feed, mobile news feed, instant articles, stories, etc.

Advanced tip: Use images of people facing to the right. Users will follow the subject’s line of sight and be more likely to read your ad text.

Aside from models, you can also feature the people behind your business and showcase some of your customers (with their permission, of course).

Typography

Clear, readable type can also attract clicks. Bright colors will help your ad stand out.

Just like with text copy, use a question or express a benefit to the user. Treat the text in the image as an extension of your copy.

Funny

Crazy or funny pictures definitely attract clicks. See I Can Has Cheeseburger, 9GAG, or any popular meme.

Unfortunately, even with descriptive ad text, these ads don’t always convert well. If you use this type of ad, set a low budget and track the performance closely. You’ll often attract lots of curiosity clicks that won’t convert.

<imgsrc=”https: neilpatel.com=”” wp-content=”” uploads=”” 2012=”” 08=”” ad-screenshots.jpg”=””>
faceboo
</imgsrc=”https:>

How to Create Images for Facebook Ads

You have three options to find images: buy them, find ones that are already licensed, or create them yourself.

You can buy stock photography at many sites including iStockPhoto or Big StockDon’t use stock photos that look like stock photos. No generic businessmen or stark white backgrounds, please.

Users recognize stock photos and will ignore them. Instead, find unique photos and give them personality by cropping or editing them and applying filters. You can use Pixlr, an online image editor, for both.

If you don’t have the money to buy photos, you can search for Creative Commons licensed images.

The third option is to create the images yourself. If you’re a graphic designer, this is easy. If you aren’t, you can still create typographic images or use basic image editing to create something original from existing pictures.

Rotate Ads

Each campaign should have at least three ads with the same interest targets. Using a small number of ads will allow you to gather data on each one. For a given campaign, only one to two ads will get a lot of impressions, so don’t bother running too many at once.

After a few days, delete the ads with the lowest click-through rates (CTRs) and keep iterating on the winners to continually increase your CTR.

Aim for 0.1% as a benchmark. You’ll likely start out closer to the average of 0.04%.

Writing Successful Facebook Ad Copy

After seeing your image, users will (hopefully) read your ad text. Here you can sell them on your product or service and earn their click.

Despite the 40 character headline and 125 character body text limits, we can still use the famous copywriting formula AIDA.

  • (A)ttention: Draw users into the ad with an attention-grabbing headline.
  • (I)nterest: Get the user interested in your product by briefly describing the most important benefit of using it.
  • (D)esire: Create immediate desire for your product with a discount, free trial, or limited time offer.
  • (A)ction: End the ad with a call to action.

AIDA is a lot to fit into 165 characters. Write five or ten ads until you’re able to fit a succinct sales pitch into the ad.

Here’s an example for an online programming course:

Become a Web Developer
Learn everything you need to become a web developer from scratch.
Save 65%. Enroll now!

Bidding on Facebook Ads

Like on any ad network, strategic bidding can mean the difference between profit and a failed test.

After you create your ad, Facebook will provide a suggested bid range. When you’re just starting out, set your bid near the low end of this range.

Your CTR will quickly start to dictate the price you’ll need to pay for traffic. If your CTR is high, your suggested bids will decrease.

If your CTR is low, you’ll need to bid more for each click. Optimize your ads and targets to continually increase your CTR.

In addition to click volume, your bid will also dictate how much of your target audience you’re able to reach.

Facebook provides a great chart for every campaign showing the size of your target audience and how much of that audience you’ve reached.

<imgsrc=”https: neilpatel.com=”” wp-content=”” uploads=”” 2012=”” 08=”” facebook-audience-reach.png”=””></imgsrc=”https:>

Increasing your bid will help your ad reach more of your target audience. If your ad is performing well but you’re reaching less than 75% of your target audience, you can increase your bid to get more clicks.

If your audience penetration is high, increasing your budget will increase your ad’s frequency: how many times a targeted user will see it.

Landing Pages for Facebook Ads

Getting a click is only the beginning. You still need the visitor to convert.

Make sure to send him to a targeted, high-converting landing page. You know their age, gender, and interests, so show them a page that will solve their problems.

The landing page should also contain the registration form or email submit box that you’ll track as a conversion.

Focus the landing page on this action, not the later sale. If you want visitors to sign up for your newsletter, show them the benefits or offer a free gift for their email.

How to Track Facebook Ads Performance

Facebook no longer offers conversion tracking. Facebook’s Ads Manager is great for data within Facebook but can’t provide information on users who have left the site.

To properly track the performance of your Facebook campaigns, you’ll need to use an analytics program like Google Analytics, or your own back-end system. Tag your links using Google’s URL builder or your own tracking tags.

Conversion Tracking

As mentioned above, make sure to separate campaigns by interest groups so that you can see how each one performs.

You can track them using the utm_campaign parameter. Use the utm_content parameter to differentiate between ads.

Ad-level tracking is useful when testing eye-catching images and before you’ve established a baseline CTR and conversion rate.

Performance Tracking

You will also need to monitor your performance within the Facebook interface. The most important metric to track is the click-through rate. Your CTR affects both the number of clicks you’ll receive and the amount you will pay per click.

Ads with a low CTR will stop serving or become more expensive. Ads with a high CTR will generate as many clicks as will fit within your budget. They will also cost less. Keep a close eye on CTR by interests and ads to learn which audiences work best and which ads resonate with them.

Keep in mind: Even the best ad’s performance will decline over time. The smaller your target audience is, the faster this will happen. Usually, you’ll see your traffic start to drop off in 3-10 days.

When this happens, refresh the ads with new images and copy. Duplicate your existing ads then change the image and ad text.

Do not edit the existing ad. Delete any existing ads not getting clicks. By the next day, you’ll see the new ads accruing impressions and clicks.

Monitor the images’ performance over time to see which generate the best CTR and maintain their traffic the longest. You can rotate high-performing images back in every few weeks until they stop getting clicked at all.

Conclusion

Despite the learning curve, Facebook advertising can be a great marketing channel for the right business. The most important points to remember are target specific interests, use eye-catching images, give users a low-friction conversion, and track everything.

After a week or two of learning what works for your business, you’ll be able to generate a steady source of Facebook conversions.

What are your best Facebook advertising tips? Share them in the comments.